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End-tidal CO2 relates to seasickness susceptibility: A study in Antarctic voyages

  • Tatsuhisa Hasegawa
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan. Tel.: +81 75 251 5603; fax: +81 75 251 5604.
    Affiliations
    National Institute of Polar Research, 10-3 Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo, Japan

    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan

    Department of Otolaryngology, Ayabe City Hospital, 20-1 Ootsuka, Aono-cho, Ayabe, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Hirofumi Oe
    Affiliations
    National Institute of Polar Research, 10-3 Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Masakatsu Taki
    Affiliations
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Hirofumi Sakaguchi
    Affiliations
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Shigeru Hirano
    Affiliations
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Yoshiro Wada
    Affiliations
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara, Japan

    Wada Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic, 4-7-15 Komagawa, Higashisumiyosi-ku, Osaka, Japan
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Published:December 13, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2016.11.005

      Abstract

      Objective

      To investigate the relationship between end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) and seasickness (motion sickness at sea) during an Antarctic voyage.

      Methods

      In this study, we measured EtCO2 and severity of seasickness using the subjective symptoms of motion sickness (SSMS). We sampled EtCO2 and SSMS every 3–4 h for 3 days from the date of sail in 16 healthy subjects. This experiment was performed on an icebreaker (standard displacement: 12,650 t).

      Results

      Since 2 subjects dropped out because of severe motion sickness, available data were collected from 14 subjects. On analysis of all data of all subjects grouped together, there seemed to be a significant negative correlation between EtCO2 and SSMS (R = −0.27, P = 0.0005). However, in individual subjects, this correlation was not obvious. During the voyage, EtCO2 level in the seasickness susceptible group was lower than that in the non-susceptible group (P = 0.018). Both EtCO2 increasing in the non-susceptible group and decreasing in the susceptible group contribute to the difference in EtCO2 levels. We suggest that the cause of this increase in EtCO2 level in the non-susceptible group was unwitting slow and deep breathing to resist seasickness.

      Conclusion

      We revealed that for seasickness during an Antarctic voyage, EtCO2 level relates to susceptibility, but not occurrence or severity. Measurement of EtCO2 levels may be useful to identify seasickness-susceptible persons and to efficiently prevent seasickness.

      Keywords

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