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Decreased CFTR/PPARγ and increased transglutaminase 2 in nasal polyps

  • Author Footnotes
    1 The first and second authors equally contributed to this work.
    Thi Nga Nguyen
    Footnotes
    1 The first and second authors equally contributed to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan

    Faculty of Public Health, Vinh Medical University, Vinh City, Vietnam
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 The first and second authors equally contributed to this work.
    Hideaki Suzuki
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555, Japan.
    Footnotes
    1 The first and second authors equally contributed to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
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  • Yasuhiro Yoshida
    Affiliations
    Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
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  • Jun-ichi Ohkubo
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
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  • Tetsuro Wakasugi
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
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  • Takuro Kitamura
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 The first and second authors equally contributed to this work.
Published:October 30, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2021.10.006

      Abstract

      Objective

      Transglutaminase (TGM)2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ are thought to participate in the pathogenesis of nasal polyp formation in cystic fibrosis (CF). We herein investigated expressions of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), TGM2, PPARγ and isopeptide bonds, a reaction product of TGM, in non-CF nasal polyps.

      Methods

      Nasal polyps and inferior turbinates were collected from chronic rhinosinusitis patients without CF during transnasal endoscopic sinonasal surgery. Expressions of CFTR, TGM2, isopeptide bonds and PPARγ were examined by fluorescence immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of CFTR was also analyzed by Western blot.

      Results

      Immunohistochemical fluorescence of the nasal polyp was significantly lower for CFTR and PPARγ, and significantly higher for TGM2 and isopeptide bonds than that of the turbinate mucosa. Lower expression of CFTR in the nasal polyp than in the turbinate mucosa was also observed in Western blot. Expression of PPARG mRNA was significantly lower in the nasal polyp than in the turbinate mucosa, whereas expressions of CFTR mRNA or TGM2 mRNA did not differ between the two tissues. Immunohistochemical fluorescence for CFTR showed significant negative correlation with that for TGM2 and isopeptide bonds, and significant positive correlation with that for PPARγ. The fluorescence for TGM2 was positively correlated with that for isopeptide bonds and negatively correlated with that for PPARγ. The fluorescence for isopeptide bonds tended to be negatively correlated with that for PPARγ.

      Conclusions

      These results suggest a possible role of the CFTR-TGM2-PPARγ cascade in the pathogenesis of nasal polyp formation in non-CF patients as in CF patients.

      Keywords

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